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Research Guide: Citation Resources

Cite Your Sources

All research assignments require you to acknowledge information you borrow and to cite your sources.

Why?

- Lend credibility to your work

- Provide consistent format

- Acknowledge academic resources

- Avoid plagiarism

Documentation & Plagiarism

 

Definition courtesy of Merriam-Webster:

Plagiarize: to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one's own: use (another's production) without crediting the source

Make every effort to document and acknowledge your sources!

Documentation Styles

Citation formats are rules and guidelines to make writing styles uniform within a specific work or publication.

 Examples: MLA (Modern Language Association)

                   APA (American Psychological Association)

                   Chicago Manual of Style

 

Useful online citation resources:

Need Help With Citing Sources?

Microsoft Word: Office, New, Report, Academic Papers and Reports, Choose Formats APA, MLA, etc.

Databases: Look for the Cite Link in the toolbar on the right hand side of the screen.

 

How To Successfully Paraphrase

Paraphrasing involves putting a passage from source material into your own words. A paraphrase must also be attributed to the original source. Paraphrased material is usually shorter than the original passage, taking a somewhat broader segment of the source and condensing it slightly.

Driscoll, Dana Lynn, and Allen Brizee. "Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing." Purdue OWL. Purdue University, 15 Feb. 2013. Web. 13 Jan. 2016.

Paraphrasing consists of at least two steps:

Step 1: Read the entire text carefully. Note the key arguments and core concepts.

Step 2: Rewrite the content you want to cover in your own words.

Once content has been successfully paraphrased and is inserted into in a paper, a citation must be included to indicate where those concepts originated.

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