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Avoiding Plagiarism: Best Practices

This guide will define plagiarism and offer tips for avoiding plagiarism.

Diagram

Avoiding plagiarism graph

Frick, T. "What you should do." How to Recognize Plagiarism. Indiana University Bloomington School of Education, 1 Oct. 2014. Web. 13 Jan. 2016.

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Quoting Directly

Quotations must be identical to the original, using a narrow segment of the source. They must match the source document word for word and must be attributed to the original author.

Driscoll, Dana Lynn, and Allen Brizee. "Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing." Purdue OWL. Purdue University, 15 Feb. 2013. Web. 13 Jan. 2016.

Use quotations sparingly. If you are going to discuss someone else's ideas, try to paraphrase or summarize as much as possible, that way it is obvious you read the work and understood it well enough to put those ideas into your own words.

How To Successfully Paraphrase

Paraphrasing involves putting a passage from source material into your own words. A paraphrase must also be attributed to the original source. Paraphrased material is usually shorter than the original passage, taking a somewhat broader segment of the source and condensing it slightly.

Driscoll, Dana Lynn, and Allen Brizee. "Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing." Purdue OWL. Purdue University, 15 Feb. 2013. Web. 13 Jan. 2016.

Paraphrasing consists of at least two steps:

Step 1: Read the entire text carefully. Note the key arguments and core concepts.

Step 2: Rewrite the content you want to cover in your own words.

Once content has been successfully paraphrased and is inserted into in a paper, a citation must be included to indicate where those concepts originated.